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Ladinos with Ladinos, Indians with IndiansLand, Labor, and Regional Ethnic Conflict in the Making of Guatemala$
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Rene Reeves

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780804752138

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804752138.001.0001

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Popular Insurrection, Liberal Reform, and Nation–State Formation: Final Reflections on Guatemala's Nineteenth Century

Popular Insurrection, Liberal Reform, and Nation–State Formation: Final Reflections on Guatemala's Nineteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.170) Chapter 6 Popular Insurrection, Liberal Reform, and Nation–State Formation: Final Reflections on Guatemala's Nineteenth Century
Source:
Ladinos with Ladinos, Indians with Indians
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804752138.003.0007

This book has attempted to resolve the paradox of why Liberalism in Guatemala became more palatable in the 1870s after being violently rejected in the 1830s. This chapter situates the findings of the various chapters within an explicitly conceptual discussion of rebellion to understand better why the conditions and contingencies of the late 1820s and 1830s ended in a massive and successful subaltern insurrection, whereas those of the 1870s and 1880s did not. The discussion begins by considering the anatomy and evolution of the Carrera Revolt, and then continues with an evaluation of its genesis and subsequent success in theoretical terms. This analysis serves as the basis for an understanding of why the Liberal Reforma did not engender a more energetic and effective popular response. Finally, it considers the Reforma's implications for Guatemalan state formation in the context of recent literature on Mexico and Andean South America.

Keywords:   Liberalism, rebellion, Carrera Revolt, Liberal Reforma, Guatemalan state formation

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