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The Woman Who Turned Into a Jaguar, and Other Narratives of Native Women in Archives of Colonial Mexico
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The Woman Who Turned Into a Jaguar, and Other Narratives of Native Women in Archives of Colonial Mexico

Lisa Sousa

Abstract

The Woman Who Turned Into a Jaguar examines gender relations in indigenous societies of central Mexico and Oaxaca from the 1520s to the 1750s, focusing mainly on the Nahua, Ñudzahui (Mixtec), Bènizàa (Zapotec), and Ayuk (Mixe) people. This study draws on an unusually rich and diverse corpus of original sources, including Ñudzahui- (Mixtec-), Tíchazàa- (Zapotec-), and mainly Nahuatl-language and Spanish civil and criminal records, published texts, and pictorial manuscripts. The sources come from more than 100 indigenous communities of highland Mexico. The book considers women’s lives in the bro ... More

Keywords: Nahuas, Mixtecs, Mixes, Zapotecs, women, gender, marriage, sexuality, labor, riots

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2017 Print ISBN-13: 9780804756402
Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2017 DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804756402.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Lisa Sousa, author
Occidental College