Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From Hot War to ColdThe U.S. Navy and National Security Affairs, 1945–1955$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jeffrey G. Barlow

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804756662

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804756662.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2018

Preparing for a New Enemy

Preparing for a New Enemy

Chapter:
(p.96) Chapter 5 Preparing for a New Enemy
Source:
From Hot War to Cold
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804756662.003.0006

This chapter discusses the emergence of the new enemy in the early postwar years. In the fall of 1945 the hopes of United States civilians and military leaders for a continuing period of peace were dashed by events in Europe and Asia. As the Soviet Union moved ever farther away from its wartime partnership with its Western Allies and began staking out its national interests more boldly in areas beyond its immediate military sway, the American interpretation of Soviet actions began changing from a neutral stance to a highly negative one. The Joint Chiefs of Staff started viewing the Soviet Union as a potential enemy and took actions accordingly. American war planning in the early postwar years was halting and somewhat disparate, as military staff officers tried to adjust their wartime concepts to the changing international situation and the likely effects of new weapon technologies such as the atomic bomb. Nonetheless, this planning increased in sophistication during the latter part of 1947, even though its focus shifted increasingly toward an overwhelming reliance on the employment of atomic weapons.

Keywords:   U.S. Navy, postwar years, Soviet Union, potential enemy, war planning

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.