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Glory and AgonyIsaac's Sacrifice and National Narrative$
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Yael Feldman

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780804759021

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804759021.001.0001

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Sacrificial Victims?

Sacrificial Victims?

The “Isaac Generation,” 1967–1973

Chapter:
(p.215) Five Sacrificial Victims?
Source:
Glory and Agony
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804759021.003.0008

The escalation of armed conflict even after the 1967 War further crystallized the aqedah as an exclusively male-to-male trope, the Hebrew equivalent of the oedipal rivalry in Freud's modern “mythology.” This psychologically distorted oedipal dynamic has been the hallmark of many male writers of the 1960s. Ironically, however, the term the Isaac Generation was coined by a woman, who until recently had been identified merely by the curious pen name Avishag. This chapter uses this “anonymous” female intruder as a figurative ploy for accessing the dialogue among the post-1967 male Yitzhakim (Isaacs), as well as between them and the women who tried to shake up their internal conversation, rife with self-deprecation.

Keywords:   aqedah, trope, oedipal rivalry, Isaac Generation, Yitzhakim

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