Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
As Light Before DawnThe Inner World of a Medieval Kabbalist$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eitan P. Fishbane

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804759137

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804759137.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see http://www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.283) Conclusion
Source:
As Light Before Dawn
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804759137.003.0009

This book has explored Isaac ben Samuel of Akko's intellectual persona, as well as the content and style of his literary creativity and the role of transmission and creative process in the construction of kabbalistic culture. Based on Isaac's writings, it has examined medieval Kabbalah in the context of the sociology of knowledge, the dynamics of contemplative intention, and the phenomenology of religion. In Me'irat 'Einayim and 'Ozar Hayyim, Isaac instructs his readers on the use of the sacred texts (in particular, the liturgical texts) as symbolic maps for the ascent of consciousness through the divine world. He exhorts the devotee to focus on both root and branch elements of the divine sefirotic tree, to visualize configurations of the divine name as a mandalic focal point for contemplation of Divinity itself, and to reject the physical world in order to ascend to celestial heights. These specific models and techniques for mystical contemplation were predicated on theurgy.

Keywords:   Isaac ben Samuel of Akko, literary creativity, transmission, Kabbalah, theurgy, intention, contemplation, Divinity, consciousness, religion

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.