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In Your FaceProfessional Improprieties and the Art of Being Conspicuous in Sixteenth-Century Italy$
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Douglas Biow

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804762151

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.001.0001

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Pietro Aretino and the Art of Conspicuous Consumption

Pietro Aretino and the Art of Conspicuous Consumption

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter 2 Pietro Aretino and the Art of Conspicuous Consumption
Source:
In Your Face
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.003.0003

This chapter examines Pietro Aretino, one of the most obnoxious in-your-face men of the sixteenth century, whose fame rested partly on his ability to frighten others into submission by threatening that he would chastise or embarrass them in public with his sharp, irreverent tongue. It explores both Aretino's own habits of eating as seen in his voluminous letters as representations for consumption by his readers in the marketplace of print, and the eating habits of his fictional characters as they are dramatized in works of imaginative literature. The discussion looks at his first comic play, the Cortigiana, and two scurrilous dialogues about food, sex, and prostitution.

Keywords:   Pietro Aretino, Aretino's eating habits, Cortigiana, imaginative literature

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