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In Your FaceProfessional Improprieties and the Art of Being Conspicuous in Sixteenth-Century Italy$
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Douglas Biow

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804762151

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.001.0001

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Benvenuto Cellini and the Art of Conspicuous Production

Benvenuto Cellini and the Art of Conspicuous Production

Chapter:
(p.133) Chapter 4 Benvenuto Cellini and the Art of Conspicuous Production
Source:
In Your Face
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.003.0005

This chapter discusses Benvenuto Cellini, the Florentine goldsmith turned sculptor who immortalized himself by telling the story of his life not only as an artist but also as a belligerent, forceful, and at times fiercely arrogant man. It focuses primarily on Cellini's monumental Vita, an innovative book written toward the end of his life and remaining in manuscript form for 159 years after his death. The Vita tells his story as a wonder-eliciting maker of objects for a public obsessed with collecting things of all sizes and value in an increasingly courtly world defined by conspicuous consumption.

Keywords:   Benvenuto Cellini, Vita, conspicuous consumption, collecting

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