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Memoirs of a GrandmotherScenes from the Cultural History of the Jews of Russia in the Nineteenth Century, Volume One$
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Pauline Wengeroff

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780804768795

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804768795.001.0001

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A Year in My Parents' House

A Year in My Parents' House

Chapter:
(p.97) 4. A Year in My Parents' House
Source:
Memoirs of a Grandmother
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804768795.003.0005

In this section, Pauline Wengeroff describes what life was like in her parents' home, which was located outside the city of Brest in Lithuania. Both her parents were God-fearing people who, like the Jews of those days, prayed three times on a daily basis and devoted the better part of the day to Talmud study. Jewish family life was very peaceful, pleasant, earnest, and sensible, not only in the house of Wengeroff's parents, but also in that of others, in the first half of the nineteenth century. In the early eighteenth century, the desolate roads in Lithuania and in many parts of Russia improved following the construction of the highways. In 1836, Brest was demolished together with the synagogue. Wengeroff also remembers the shevuaus (Pentecost) holiday, a festival celebrated by the Jews by eating everything and everywhere, unlike during Passover, when they could not eat everything, and on Tabernacles, when they could not eat everywhere.

Keywords:   Pauline Wengeroff, parents, Brest, Russia, Lithuania, Jews, shevuaus, Talmud, family life, synagogue

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