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Special RelationsThe Americanization of Britain?$
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Howard Malchow

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780804773997

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.001.0001

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Dystopias

Dystopias

Chapter:
(p.249) Chapter 10 Dystopias
Source:
Special Relations
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.003.0011

This chapter deals with the different genres of dystopias. Television significantly played in the antimodern warnings of cultural crisis and visions of future dystopia. Cultural damage from the left as well as the right in both the United States and Britain were anticipated from the start of the television era. The media-promoted and politician-massaged concern about rising crime rates was a transatlantic phenomenon. CBS put together a conference of social scientists to assess “ways and means of securing realistic estimates of the different effects of exposure to television violence” in 1969. By 1970, there was a speedily rising concern in Britain about urban violence. Furthermore, a group of British political scientists maintained that the British environmental movement was a distinct phenomenon less driven by “hysteria”.

Keywords:   dystopias, United States, Britain, CBS, television violence, urban violence, British environmental movement

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