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Nationalists Who Feared the NationAdriatic Multi-Nationalism in Habsburg Dalmatia, Trieste, and Venice$
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Dominique Kirchner Reill

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804774468

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804774468.001.0001

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Conclusion: From Bridge To Border—the Adriatic In the Nineteenth Century

Conclusion: From Bridge To Border—the Adriatic In the Nineteenth Century

Chapter:
(p.233) Conclusion: From Bridge To Border—the Adriatic In the Nineteenth Century
Source:
Nationalists Who Feared the Nation
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804774468.003.0008

This chapter traces the final fate of the Adriatic multi-national movement, its proponents, and the significance of their failure for understandings of nationalism, pluralism, and regionalism. With the revolutions' end, the Habsburg administration worked to loosen the ties binding the Sea's eastern and western shores. During the period 1848–49, imperial authorities had expected much more support from the Triestine and Dalmatian communities for the Venetian revolution than had actually occurred. Now that there was peace, measures were taken to secure that there would be no danger of future revolutionary or Italian national sentiment infecting the eastern Adriatic coast.

Keywords:   Adriatic multi-national movement, nationalism, pluralism, regionalism

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