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Cleansing Honor with BloodMasculinity, Violence, and Power in the Backlands of Northeast Brazil, 1845–1889$
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Martha Santos

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804774567

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804774567.001.0001

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Unruly Soldiers and Honorable Providers: Paradoxes of Masculinity and State Formation in the Backlands, 1840s–89

Unruly Soldiers and Honorable Providers: Paradoxes of Masculinity and State Formation in the Backlands, 1840s–89

Chapter:
(p.45) Chapter 2 Unruly Soldiers and Honorable Providers: Paradoxes of Masculinity and State Formation in the Backlands, 1840s–89
Source:
Cleansing Honor with Blood
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804774567.003.0003

This chapter examines the legal position of the sertanejos of Ceará, Brazil, within the political order of the empire and how they inserted honor into their political practice. It explains that sertanejo men relied on their honorable reputations as strategic resources to retain autonomy because of their limited citizenship rights and a weak legal standing and that some smallholders even attempted bolster their claims to status by flaunting their achievement of a measure of economic security and independence as symbols of masculine honor and respectability. This chapter highlights the violent struggles for masculine authority in the process of state formation.

Keywords:   sertanejo men, legal position, political order, Ceará, Brazil, honorable reputations, autonomy, economic security, state formation, masculine authority

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