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The Aesthetics of HateFar-Right Intellectuals, Antisemitism, and Gender in 1930s France$
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Sandrine Sanos

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804774574

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804774574.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
The Aesthetics of Hate
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804774574.003.0001

This introductory chapter presents an overview of the discussions in this book. The book focuses on far-right intellectuals composed of men such as novelist Robert Brasillach, essayist Thierry Maulnier, music and film critic Lucien Rebatet, and editors Jean de Fabrègues and Jean–Pierre Maxence. The book determines the extent of their redefinition of far-right and fascist politics by exploring the logic by which gender, sex, race, and empire structured and underscored their particular vision of the nation. The chapter also explains the meaning of the term, “aesthetics of hate”, which characterizes the reflections of these far-right intellectuals.

Keywords:   far-right intellectuals, Robert Brasillach, Thierry Maulnier, Lucien Rebatet, Jean de Fabrègues, Jean–Pierre Maxence, aesthetics of hate, fascism

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