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The Aesthetics of HateFar-Right Intellectuals, Antisemitism, and Gender in 1930s France$
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Sandrine Sanos

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804774574

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804774574.001.0001

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“Will We Get Out of French Abjection?”

“Will We Get Out of French Abjection?”

The Politics and Aesthetic Insurgency of the Young New Right

Chapter:
(p.75) 3 “Will We Get Out of French Abjection?”
Source:
The Aesthetics of Hate
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804774574.003.0004

This chapter examines the views of the Young New Right. It cites the significance of issues such as a proper politics of culture and race and the definition of a French nationalism—namely, who constituted proper French citizens and subjects and therefore, what type of anti-Semitism should be espoused. It explores how obsessions with Jewishness and “Blum” anchored the Young New Right's nationalism, by addressing the ways in which their rhetoric relied upon fundamental, but somewhat implicit terms—“culture,” “civilization,” and “man.” In 1937, it became inseparable from the political and aesthetic alienation they experienced—in the form of abjection—and how they chose to explain it.

Keywords:   Young New Right, culture, race, civilization, Jewishness, French nationalism, anti-Semitism, abjection

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