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Transformative BeautyArt Museums in Industrial Britain$
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Amy Woodson-Boulton

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804778046

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804778046.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.175) Epilogue
Source:
Transformative Beauty
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804778046.003.0007

Reformers have pushed through museum projects in Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester, encountering different obstacles and opportunities depending on local context. In the early twentieth century, fresh ideas gradually translated the municipal art museums. Birmingham, Liverpool, and Manchester have established their museums with help from reformers heavily impacted by the Ruskinian idea of bringing beauty to the masses. These museums have gradually given their paintings chronological organization, highlighting the extent to which the museums have become instruments to instruct visitors in art history. The art and idealism of the nineteenth century could become an inspiration for a new generation of those who would again seek to challenge industrial capitalism through art and craft and, explicitly this time, social and sexual revolution.

Keywords:   municipal art museums, Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, reformers, paintings, art history, idealism, industrial capitalism, Ruskinian

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