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Income InequalityEconomic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries$
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Janet C. Gornick and Markus Jantti

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804778244

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804778244.001.0001

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Horizontal and Vertical Inequalities in India

Horizontal and Vertical Inequalities in India

Chapter:
(p.439) Chapter Sixteen Horizontal and Vertical Inequalities in India
Source:
Income Inequality
Author(s):

Reeve Vanneman

Amaresh Dubey

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804778244.003.0017

This chapter examines income inequality in India. LIS income data for India confirm that the income inequality in India (with a Gini of 0.48) is in the same range as for other low- and middle-income countries. Earlier estimates for Indian inequality have been lower because they were based on expenditure data. Separate estimates for 22 Indian states and state groups reveal a wide range of both income levels and income inequality. All Indian states have lower incomes and more income inequality than any high-income LIS country. Across Indian states, income inequality is not closely related to income levels; nor are income inequality and income levels closely related among high-income countries. Nevertheless, because all high-income LIS countries have lower income inequality than any Indian state or other middle-income country, globally there is a strong negative correlation linking lower incomes with more inequality.

Keywords:   India, income, expenditure, inequality, Luxembourg Income Study

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