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Income InequalityEconomic Disparities and the Middle Class in Affluent Countries$
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Janet C. Gornick and Markus Jantti

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804778244

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804778244.001.0001

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Income Distribution, Inequality Perceptions, and Redistributive Preferences in European Countries

Income Distribution, Inequality Perceptions, and Redistributive Preferences in European Countries

Chapter:
(p.173) Chapter Six Income Distribution, Inequality Perceptions, and Redistributive Preferences in European Countries
Source:
Income Inequality
Author(s):

István György Tóth

Tamás Keller

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804778244.003.0007

This chapter analyses how redistributive preference relates to actual income and to its distribution. For measuring redistributive preference a composite index is developed using public opinion (Eurobarometer) survey data. An empirical analysis of the data is presented, covering 17 European countries, on both the macro and micro level. To measure the relationship on the macro level, distance-based measures of income inequality (P-ratios, based on data from LIS) are defined and used to estimate contextual effects on individual redistributive claims. At the individual micro level, mechanisms such as self-interest, failure attribution, inequality sensitivity, and value preferences are tested. The results presented in this chapter can contribute to a refinement of the predictions developed in the frame of the median voter theorem and, via this, to a better understanding of political processes.

Keywords:   redistributive preference, distance based of inequality measures, Luxembourg Income Study, Eurobarometer, European countries, macro and micro level analysis, median voter theorem, self-interest, failure attribution, inequality sensitivity

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