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Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish ModernityArchitect of Zionism, Yiddishism, and Orthodoxy$
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Jess Olson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804778732

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804778732.001.0001

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The Eastward Gaze

The Eastward Gaze

The 1907 Elections and the Yiddish Language Conference

Chapter:
(p.154) Four The Eastward Gaze
Source:
Nathan Birnbaum and Jewish Modernity
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804778732.003.0005

In 1907, Nathan Birnbaum was one of twenty Jewish nationalists who campaigned in the election for a seat in the lower house of the Reichsrat in Austria. Three years before that, Birnbaum had radically altered his view of Jewish nationalism, turning away from the parochial factionalism of Zionism in favor of a new approach that went beyond organized Zionist politics. That was also the year Theodor Herzl died. In the next few years, Birnbaum took part in two closely interrelated efforts: an attempt to put into action the ecumenical nationalist Jewish People's Party model and an attempt to redefine Jewish cultural renewal based on the Yiddish language when he served as president of the First Yiddish Language Conference held in Czernowitz in 1908.

Keywords:   Nathan Birnbaum, election, Austria, nationalism, Zionism, politics, Jewish People's Party, cultural renewal, Yiddish language, Yiddish Language Conference

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