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Mixing MusicsTurkish Jewry and the Urban Landscape of a Sacred Song$
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Maureen Jackson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804780155

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804780155.001.0001

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Into the Nation:A Musical Landscape in Flux

Into the Nation:A Musical Landscape in Flux

Chapter:
(p.49) Two Into the Nation:A Musical Landscape in Flux
Source:
Mixing Musics
Author(s):

Maureen Jackson

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804780155.003.0003

Based on the analysis of Ottoman urban music-making in Chapter One, this chapter investigates transformations accompanying the dissolution of the empire and the establishment of the nation. It proposes a minority-focused historicization of the early Turkish Republic to foreground late Ottoman factors, particularly developments in the recording and entertainment industries that initially provided new musical spaces and patronage for Jews, despite their imperial and Republican political losses after 1923. In the course of a secularizing, Europeanizing reform movement that witnessed an exchange of Jewish musical expertise through incoming German and Austrian musicians and outgoing Turkish Jewish hazanim, remaining Jews engaged with traditionalist non-Jewish performers in alternative venues and patronage patterns to sustain Ottoman court music forms in a nation-building era, and by extension, in Turkish synagogues.

Keywords:   empire, nation, historiography, minority, Europeanization, secularization, German musicians, Austrian musicians

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