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The Political Economy of Environmental Justice$
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H. Spencer Banzhaf

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804780612

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804780612.001.0001

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Environmental Gentrification and Discrimination

Environmental Gentrification and Discrimination

Chapter:
(p.75) 4 Environmental Gentrification and Discrimination
Source:
The Political Economy of Environmental Justice
Author(s):

H. Spencer Banzhaf

Joshua Sidon

Randall P. Walsh

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804780612.003.0004

This chapter highlights the importance of interpreting housing market dynamics in the context of demographic groups who have preferences not only over local environmental conditions and housing prices but also over the demographic composition of the community itself. In this context, this chapter shows that such forces for segregation reinforce the socioeconomic pressures driving environmental justice correlations. It argues that not only can richer white people outbid poorer minorities for cleaner, healthier communities, driving up the cost of accessing these communities, but these communities are even more expensive simply because they are whiter, further driving away minorities. These forces also mitigate gentrification results: the racial composition of a community is a stabilizing force, making it harder to displace local populations.

Keywords:   housing market dynamics, demographic composition, environmental justice, housing prices

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