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The Political Economy of Environmental Justice$
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H. Spencer Banzhaf

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804780612

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804780612.001.0001

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Residential Mobility and Ozone Exposure

Residential Mobility and Ozone Exposure

Challenges for Environmental Justice Policy

Chapter:
(p.115) 5 Residential Mobility and Ozone Exposure
Source:
The Political Economy of Environmental Justice
Author(s):

Brooks Depro

Christopher Timmins

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804780612.003.0005

This chapter discusses residential mobility in San Francisco, California. Matching housing sales to households over time, it explores the mobility patterns of specific households as they move from one house to another. It notes that when poorer households “trade up” to bigger homes, blacks and Hispanics tend to move into neighborhoods with more ozone pollution than do whites. This chapter also provides preliminary evidence that this may be a consequence of the fact that minorities face a higher cost of finding similarly sized houses in clean communities than do whites. This, in turn, may be because of discrimination in the housing market or because minorities are prioritizing other public goods over ozone.

Keywords:   San Francisco residential mobility, mobility patters, ozone pollution, housing discrimination

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