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Breakdown in PakistanHow Aid Is Eroding Institutions for Collective Action$
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Masooda Bano

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804781329

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804781329.001.0001

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Intrinsic or Extrinsic Incentives

Intrinsic or Extrinsic Incentives

The Evolution of Cooperative Groups in Pakistan

Chapter:
(p.28) 2 Intrinsic or Extrinsic Incentives
Source:
Breakdown in Pakistan
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804781329.003.0002

This chapter analyzes the origins and changes in the major forms of other-regarding and self-regarding groups within Pakistan. The first portion of the chapter helps readers understand the complications within the civic groups that make up the civil society landscape within the country and assesses what the self-regarding and other-regarding groups owe their origin to. From here the discussion shifts to an outline of the development of these two types of groups within Muslim communities of South Asia. It also reveals a certain point of origin for each type of group (at this point in the discussion there are four types of groups that have been identified, namely the anjumans, the NGOs, the religiously inspired associational networks, and the political organizations). The concluding portion of this chapter discusses how the groups that use development aid vary from the groups that don't.

Keywords:   civic groups, Muslim communities, anjumans, NGOs, associational networks, political organizations, development aid

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