Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century Mexico: The Other Half of the Centaur

Wil G. Pansters

Abstract

Mexico is currently undergoing a crisis of violence and insecurity that poses serious threats to democratic transition and rule of law. This is the first book to put these developments in the context of post-revolutionary state-making in Mexico and to show that violence in the country is not the result of state failure, but of state-making. While most accounts of politics and the state in recent decades have emphasized processes of transition, institutional conflict resolution, and neo-liberal reform, this book lays out the increasingly important role of violence and coercion by a range of sta ... More

Keywords: Mexico, violence, coercion, state-making, conflict resolution, neo-liberal reform, post-revolutionary period, democratic transition

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2012 Print ISBN-13: 9780804781589
Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013 DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804781589.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Wil G. Pansters, editor

Show Summary Details

subscribe or login to access all content.

Contents

View:

Part One Introduction

Part Two Coercive Pillars of State-Making: Borders, Policing, and Army

Part Three In the Gray Zone: Drugs, Violence, Globalization, and the State

Part Four State-Making and Violence in Society: Corporatism, Clientelism, and Indigenous Communities

Chapter Eight The Rise of Gangsterism and Charrismo

Marcos Aguila and Jeffrey Bortz

Part Five Comparative Conclusions

End Matter