Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century MexicoThe Other Half of the Centaur$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Wil G. Pansters

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804781589

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804781589.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see http://www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 July 2018

Policing New Illegalities

Policing New Illegalities

Piracy, Raids, and Madrinas

Chapter:
(p.159) Chapter Seven Policing New Illegalities
Source:
Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Author(s):
José Carlos G. Aguiar
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804781589.003.0007

In the 1980s, markets and street commerce in Mexico began to peddle copyright-protected material such as music and films. To eradicate this new form of illegality, Mexican president Vicente Fox (2000–2006) launched a war on piracy anchored on a number of policies and constitutional reforms. As part of this campaign, the Mexican police conducted raids on piracy retail while the government declared the sale of bootlegged goods as a federal crime and infringements of intellectual property as organized crime. Drawing on interviews with informants, this chapter examines a number of anti-piracy raids carried out in the San Juan de Dios market, located in the metropolitan area of Guadalajara. In particular, it investigates the ambiguous accommodations that emerge from the interaction between policing agents like the federal police, and informal actors such as market sellers. It explores the behavior of structured protocols and agents such as madrinas (information traders) and pitazos (lookouts, warnings). The chapter shows that the definition of new forms of illegality in the context of global neoliberalism reflects the political skewness between regions.

Keywords:   illegality, war on piracy, raids, crime, intellectual property, San Juan de Dios, federal police, madrinas, neoliberalism

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.