Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
In History's GripPhilip Roth's Newark Trilogy$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michael Kimmage

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804781824

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804781824.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see http://www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 April 2018

At History's Mercy

At History's Mercy

Chapter:
(p.97) Three At History's Mercy
Source:
In History's Grip
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804781824.003.0004

In his Newark trilogy—American Pastoral (1997), I Married a Communist (1998), and The Human Stain (2000)—Philip Roth depicts history as an abstraction that moves through patterns larger than any individual story and less general than fortune or circumstance. As a place that is very often left, Newark is stereotypically American, whose destruction lies at the core of Roth's three novels. The city's decline is connected to the July 1967 riots, the national meaning of which is peripheral to the Newark trilogy. These riots resulted in the loss of neighborhood life, of communal memory, of a city that immigrants, particularly blacks, had done much to build. Like literacy, muteness is one of the trilogy's master themes, reflected in its opposite—the assertive plenitude of narrative, storytelling, and literature.

Keywords:   Newark trilogy, American Pastoral, I Married a Communist, The Human Stain, Philip Roth, history, muteness, immigrants, riots, destruction

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.