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Contested Welfare StatesWelfare Attitudes in Europe and Beyond$
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Stefan Svallfors

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804782524

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804782524.001.0001

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Welfare Performance and Welfare Support

Welfare Performance and Welfare Support

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter Two: Welfare Performance and Welfare Support
Source:
Contested Welfare States
Author(s):
Wim Van Oorschot, Bart Meuleman
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804782524.003.0002

This chapter examines the relationship between perceived welfare performance and people's support for welfare state responsibility. It indicates that performance has predictive power in addition to the more classical indicators of interest and ideology. Overall, the effect is negative in the sense that persons who perceive the standard of living of certain groups as unfavorable are more supportive of government intervention targeting these groups. Nevertheless, this chapter concludes that the strength of the negative effect varies along with general attitudes toward the target group and across countries.

Keywords:   welfare state responsibility, government intervention, popular support, welfare performance

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