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Contested Welfare StatesWelfare Attitudes in Europe and Beyond$
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Stefan Svallfors

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804782524

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804782524.001.0001

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Framing Theory, Welfare Attitudes, and the United States Case1

Framing Theory, Welfare Attitudes, and the United States Case1

Chapter:
(p.193) Chapter Seven Framing Theory, Welfare Attitudes, and the United States Case1
Source:
Contested Welfare States
Author(s):
Clem Brooks
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804782524.003.0007

This chapter puts the European findings into comparative perspective by using a national survey from the United States, in which a large section of the ESS 2008 Welfare Attitudes module was replicated. It shows that when it comes to government responsibilities, American attitudes are quite different from the European mean, in that Americans ask for much less responsibility from government for the welfare of citizens. This chapter also used data and theoretical perspective on opinion formation through the use of embedded survey experiments.

Keywords:   ESS 2008 Welfare Attitudes, government responsibilities, welfare, United States, opinion formation

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