Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Thinking Its PresenceForm, Race, and Subjectivity in Contemporary Asian American Poetry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Dorothy J. Wang

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804783651

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804783651.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see http://www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 April 2018

Subjunctive Subjects Pamela Lu’s Pamela: A Novel and the Poetics and Politics of Diaspora

Subjunctive Subjects Pamela Lu’s Pamela: A Novel and the Poetics and Politics of Diaspora

Chapter:
(p.272) Eight Subjunctive Subjects Pamela Lu’s Pamela: A Novel and the Poetics and Politics of Diaspora
Source:
Thinking Its Presence
Author(s):

Dorothy J. Wang

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804783651.003.0008

This chapter examines Pamela Lu’s Pamela: A Novel—a text that refuses easy categorization by almost any criteria. Thought its title makes knowing reference to one of the founding texts of the English novelistic canon and its syntax often takes the form of ’well-written,’ somewhat formal, sentences, this Pamela is nonnarrative, filtered solely through the consciousness of a twenty-something Chinese American Californian. Markers of race are almost completely erased in the text, yet this is not a ’post-race’ novel, as some have averred. While Pamela: A Novel displays almost no thematic references to race, the consciousness of the Chinese-American narrator cannot be separated from the tale the book tells, nor from the very form of its poetic sentences, Indeed the text is so fully infused with the consciousness of this doubly minoritized narrator that it need not mark it’s speaker’s identity overtly or thematically.

Keywords:   subjects, Pamela Lu, Pamela, poetry, diaspora, Asian American, post-race

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.