Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
After YugoslaviaThe Cultural Spaces of a Vanished Land$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Radmila Gorup

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784023

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784023.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see http://www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 22 April 2018

Yugoslavia A Defeated Argument?

Yugoslavia A Defeated Argument?

Chapter:
(p.38) 2 Yugoslavia A Defeated Argument?
Source:
After Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Vesna Goldsworthy

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784023.003.0003

In one of the three personal essays in this volume, Goldsworthy argues that Yugoslavia as a defeated argument refuses to go away. She brings old documents and artifacts--her album, postcard, passport, and identity card--to speak of the return of the Yugoslav repressed. Goldsworthy calls herself better versed in writing about “the idyll of Tito’s Yugoslavia” although her firsthand memories have been partly supplanted by the violent “newsreel” Yugoslavia of the 1990s mediascapes. Admitting freely to her own possessive nostalgia, Goldsworthy notes the irritation one feels at others’ memories, which always seem to falsify our own. She turns to the dimmed appeal of the European Union, whose byzantine bureaucracy looks familiar to post-Yugoslavs: both confederations derive from the afterlife of Austria-Hungary. Finally, Goldsworthy points to the post-Yugoslav culture flourishing in a multitude of languages and in places where one does not expect to find it.

Keywords:   socialist Yugoslavia, “newsreel” Yugoslavia, memoir, Yugoslav diaspora, former Yugoslavs, nostalgia

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.