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After YugoslaviaThe Cultural Spaces of a Vanished Land$
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Radmila Gorup

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784023

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784023.001.0001

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Discordia Concors

Discordia Concors

Central Europe in Post-Yugoslav Discourses

Chapter:
(p.88) 5 Discordia Concors
Source:
After Yugoslavia
Author(s):

Vladimir Zorić

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784023.003.0006

This chapter discusses the tropes of post-Yugoslav perceptions of Central Europe by looking at the works of such post-Yugoslav writers as Dragan Velikić, Laszlo Végel, and Drago Jančar. The argument shows how the perceptions of Central Europe in the writings of these authors add up to differing understandings of historical processes. It becomes apparent that Central Europe is not a viable political option but a versatile trope of pluralistic space enabling the authors to articulate their nations' transition from the shared past in the Yugoslav Federation to a prospective future in the EU. Finally, this chapter moves from post-Yugoslav visions of historical time to new, imaginative maps of Central European space. The three authors under discussion focus on boundary regions, particularly Trieste, but it becomes obvious that their interest in Trieste as a multicultural city conceals different understandings of what multiculturality is.

Keywords:   Central Europe, transition, post-Yugoslav authors, center and periphery, hegemony of the center, multiculturality, modern universalism

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