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Community at RiskBiodefense and the Collective Search for Security$
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Thomas D. Beamish

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784429

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784429.001.0001

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Davis, California

Davis, California

Home Rule Civics and Biodefense

Chapter:
(p.76) Chapter 3 Davis, California
Source:
Community at Risk
Author(s):

Thomas D. Beamish

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784429.003.0003

Chapter 3 empirically examines the risk dispute that erupted in Davis, California, and how the community’s style of home rule civics and discourse shaped local deliberations regarding the University of California–Davis’s (UCD) biodefense plans. The chapter develops the role that Davis’s civic and political history has played in generating a field of political relations and set of value claims that heavily influenced civic dynamics in town. The chapter specifically focuses on the political-cultural resources mobilized to justify local opposition in the risk dispute surrounding UCD’s biodefense ambitions, while also addressing the counterclaims of those who supported the university and its plans. Chapter 3 demonstrates that the claims levied in the risk dispute emerged from a specific civic and political legacy; they were not new, although they targeted a new technology and risk management plan.

Keywords:   Progressive politics, pastoralism, domesticity, home rule, community studies, civic politics, community movements

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