Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
An Industrious MindThe Worlds of Sir Simonds D'Ewes$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

J. Sears McGee

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780804785464

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804785464.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 December 2018

“An Iliad of miseries”—1639–1640

“An Iliad of miseries”—1639–1640

Chapter:
(p.282) Chapter 6 “An Iliad of miseries”—1639–1640
Source:
An Industrious Mind
Author(s):

J. Sears McGee

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804785464.003.0007

In November, 1639, King Charles I appointed D’Ewes as the sheriff of Suffolk, his first public office and a highly unwelcome one because he was charged with collecting the hated levy known as “ship money.” Stuck with this task for a year, he spent most of his energy dragging his feet and attracting the ire of the Privy Council in London (like many of his fellow sheriffs around the country). Yet he also managed to find time to work on a project he had begun earlier, the production of an Anglo-Saxon/English dictionary. In October, 1640, he was elected to represent the town of Suffolk in the new parliament that the king had called, the first since 1629. The chapter concludes with a descriptions of D’Ewes’s efforts in the House of Commons to overthrow the religious and political policies the king had introduced.

Keywords:   shrievalty, ship money, Anglo-Saxon, episcopacy, Root and Branch Petition

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.