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Cities, Business, and the Politics of Urban Violence In Latin America$
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Eduardo Moncada

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780804794176

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804794176.001.0001

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The Politics of Urban Violence

The Politics of Urban Violence

Comparisons and Next Steps

Chapter:
(p.156) 6 The Politics of Urban Violence
Source:
Cities, Business, and the Politics of Urban Violence In Latin America
Author(s):

Eduardo Moncada

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804794176.003.0006

Chapter abstract: This chapter develops cross-case analyses of the politics of urban violence in Colombia to highlight how the variables and mechanisms identified in the analytic framework yield insights into the nature and trajectory of political projects in response to violence across cities. The chapter explores the generalizability of the framework’s core dimensions through a brief analysis of the case of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, where drug trafficking-related violence has increased in recent years. The analysis finds support for three key elements of the framework: (1) business is a pivotal actor in the politics of urban violence, (2) clientelism shapes political preferences regarding responses to urban violence, and (3) patterns of armed territorial control influence the fortunes of political projects in response to violence. The chapter concludes by outlining next steps in the study of urban violence and, more broadly, urban politics in the developing world.

Keywords:   Ciudad Juarez, Colombia, drug trafficking, clientelism, urban violence, urban politics, territorial control

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