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Composing EgyptReading, Writing, and the Emergence of a Modern Nation, 1870-1930$
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Hoda A. Yousef

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780804797115

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804797115.001.0001

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Writing to be Seen and Heard

Writing to be Seen and Heard

Petitions and Protests

Chapter:
(p.103) 4 Writing to be Seen and Heard
Source:
Composing Egypt
Author(s):

Hoda A. Yousef

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804797115.003.0006

This chapter examines how new literacies impacted the protest and petitioning movements of the early twentieth century. Older forms of communication and writing were adapted to the changing discourses and technologies of the era as individuals and groups sought to channel discussions on nationalism, education, and Egyptian-ness to press their cases and attempt to influence the official course of Egyptian politics. The chapter culminates in the events and aftermath of the 1919 revolution in Egypt, when many of the new technologies of public literacies were deployed by various segments of the Egyptian populace in their attempt to throw off the yoke of the British Protectorate. Ultimately, though many people engaged with these literacies, written forums also imposed their own unevenness, as access to printers and more expensive “modern” forms of literacy determined who could be “seen” in the public spaces of literary production.

Keywords:   protests, petitions, 1919 revolution, public debate, strikes, telegraphy, scribes, British colonialism

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