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Trust, but VerifyThe Politics of Uncertainty and the Transformation of the Cold War Order, 1969-1991$
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Martin Klimke, Reinhild Kreis, and Christian F. Ostermann

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780804798099

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804798099.001.0001

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Trust and Transparency at the CSCE, 1969–1975

Trust and Transparency at the CSCE, 1969–1975

Chapter:
(p.102) 5. Trust and Transparency at the CSCE, 1969–1975
Source:
Trust, but Verify
Author(s):

Michael Cotey Morgan

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804798099.003.0006

This chapter examines the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) from 1969 to 1975. It contends that trust was both a tool and objective of the conference, detailing how, even in the absence of trust, a major international agreement was concluded with the Helsinki Final Act of 1975, the outcome of the CSCE talks. In a clear attempt to advance their respective interests, Warsaw Pact member states focused on state sovereignty and the immutability of post-World War II European borders as a cornerstone of their definition of international security, whereas North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) member states emphasized transparency, freer movement, and human rights, as well as confidence-building measures. As this chapter argues, the “tangled lines of trust and distrust” at the CSCE among the United States, the Western European countries, the neutral states, and the Soviet Union were incredibly complex, but they eventually secured the conference's success.

Keywords:   CSCE, Helsinki Final Act of 1975, international security, confidence-building measures, United States, Western European countries, Soviet Union, neutral states

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