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Luxurious NetworksSalt Merchants, Status, and Statecraft in Eighteenth-Century China$
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Yulian Wu

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780804798112

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804798112.001.0001

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Luxury and Lineage

Luxury and Lineage

Chapter:
(p.127) Four Luxury and Lineage
Source:
Luxurious Networks
Author(s):

Yulian Wu

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804798112.003.0005

This chapter takes the case of the Bao family from Tangyue village to explore the ways in which salt merchants patronized lineage construction projects as a means to expand the influences of their families in the countryside of Huizhou and to strengthen a connection with urban scholarly elites. By tracing the construction process of three lineage projects sponsored by the Bao household—the publishing of a new genealogy, the construction of a shrine, and the donation of charitable lands—the author shows how the Bao merchants patronized specific lineage construction projects, which functioned as luxury items sanctioned by Confucian moral example. Through these cultural objects, the Bao family expanded their influence in their rural homeland in Huizhou, and displayed their moral values for the benefit of scholarly elites in the court and Jiangnan urban centers, creating connections between the countryside and the city, and the central and local.

Keywords:   Bao Zhidao, Tangyue, lineage, genealogy, shrine, stele, Confucian morality, luxury consumption, patronage, charitable land

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