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To Belong in Buenos AiresGermans, Argentines, and the Rise of a Pluralist Society$
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Benjamin Bryce

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781503601536

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503601536.001.0001

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Transatlantic Religion and the Boundaries of Community

Transatlantic Religion and the Boundaries of Community

Chapter:
(p.109) Chapter 5 Transatlantic Religion and the Boundaries of Community
Source:
To Belong in Buenos Aires
Author(s):

Benjamin Bryce

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503601536.003.0006

This chapter argues that denominational identities influenced how German-speaking Lutherans and Catholics in Argentina understood the boundaries of community and their sense of belonging in Argentine society. It charts the efforts of Lutheran and Catholic organizations in Germany to promote German-language religion in Buenos Aires and the Río de la Plata region, and it examines how these transatlantic ties helped shape some of the core German-language institutions of Argentina. German speakers maintained relations with various religious organizations in Imperial and Weimar Germany, but they drew selectively on this support to foster both religious and linguistic pluralism in Argentina. Ultimately, support from Germany came with few strings attached, and it gave German-speaking Lutherans and Catholics access to German-speaking pastors and priests, as well as extra financial resources.

Keywords:   transatlantic connections, religion, denominational difference, imperial nationalism, Catholic Church, Lutheran Church, Gustav Adolf Association, language, Germandom abroad

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