Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Risen from RuinsThe Cultural Politics of Rebuilding East Berlin$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Paul Stangl

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781503603202

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503603202.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use (for details see www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 21 October 2018

Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.260) Conclusion
Source:
Risen from Ruins
Author(s):

Paul Stangl

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503603202.003.0008

Key cultural and political groups displayed a great deal of internal unity in their approach to the urban landscape due to their adherence to the same frameworks of interpretation and political interests. This is not to imply that humans agency was irrelevant. Individuals and groups created and altered these frameworks, and made decisions about how to apply them to the city. The triad of place-based meaning, spatial/formal relations and representation was consistently significant, albeit with vastly different levels of importance attached to each on a case-by-case basis. The differential treatment of memorials, monumental architecture, vernacular buildings, public spaces, and city plans suggests that they differed in how they conveyed cultural meaning. The construction of the Berlin Wall in 1961 made an emphatic statement about the GDR that would always stand as a counterpoint to its other building projects.

Keywords:   Berlin Wall, structure and agency, Communist legacy

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.