Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
After the Fall of the WallLife Courses in the Transformation of East Germany$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Martin Diewald, Anne Goedicke, and Karl Ulrich Mayer

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780804752084

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804752084.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 30 October 2020

Spirals of Success and Failure? the Interplay of Control Beliefs and Working Lives in the Transition from Planned to Market Economy

Spirals of Success and Failure? the Interplay of Control Beliefs and Working Lives in the Transition from Planned to Market Economy

Chapter:
(p.214) Chapter Ten Spirals of Success and Failure? the Interplay of Control Beliefs and Working Lives in the Transition from Planned to Market Economy
Source:
After the Fall of the Wall
Author(s):
Anne Diewald
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804752084.003.0010

This chapter examines whether the situation after 1989 opened up new avenues for creating and mobilizing effort and self-initiative. It introduces the concept of control beliefs in the contexts of working lives and abrupt system change, and investigates, on the basis of three waves of longitudinal data, whether personality dispositions such as control and efficacy beliefs differentiated actors in their coping with new and adverse conditions, and whether massive changes in social context and one's individual life inversely changed personality dispositions. The results show that the most frequent working-life transitions were not driven through perceived control during the whole period under observation from the very beginning of the transformation until 1996. However, to achieve the comparatively infrequent upward moves, East Germans could profit from internal control beliefs.

Keywords:   self-initiative, East Germany, control beliefs, personality dispositions

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.