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Between Justice and PoliticsThe Ligue des Droits de l'Homme, 1898-1945$
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William D. Irvine

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753173

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753173.001.0001

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Origins, Organization, and Structure

Origins, Organization, and Structure

Chapter:
(p.5) One Origins, Organization, and Structure
Source:
Between Justice and Politics
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753173.003.0002

In 1894 Captain Alfred Dreyfus, a French army officer, was charged with espionage and sentenced to life imprisonment. When the government refused to reopen the case, the famous novelist Emile Zola published an open letter to the President of the Republic of France accusing the army of deliberately convicting an innocent man. The letter, entitled J'Accuse, appeared in January 1898 in the Radical newspaper L'Aurore. It drew the ire of the government, which promptly filed criminal charges against Zola. In the wake of the Zola trial, On February 20, 1898, a group of upper-class intellectuals met at the home of Senator Ludovic Trarieux in Paris and formed an organization they called Ligue des droits de l'homme (League of the Rights of Man). Despite the end of the Dreyfus affair, the League decided to continue its campaign for justice. This chapter focuses on the origins, organization, and structure of the League. It describes the League's membership profile and activities, including its annual congress.

Keywords:   Alfred Dreyfus, espionage, Emil Zola, France, Ludovic Trarieux, Ligue des droits de l'homme, League of the Rights of Man, congress, membership, justice

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