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Emperor and AncestorState and Lineage in South China$
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David Faure

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753180

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753180.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 24 July 2021

The Mulberry Garden Dike

The Mulberry Garden Dike

Chapter:
(p.253) Chapter Eighteen The Mulberry Garden Dike
Source:
Emperor and Ancestor
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753180.003.0018

The Pearl River Delta was comprised of numerous islands of sedimentary deposits attached to the edges of hilly outcrops. Located on one such island were Jiujiang, Longjiang, and Longshan. Since the fourteenth century, mud embankments had been built all along the island coastline to prevent floods. A series of embankments designed to protect the entire island from flooding came to be known as the Mulberry Garden Dike, which was inundated between 1647 and 1794 during the Ming dynasty and after the Qing dynasty took over. The lineages collaborated with the government to prevent flooding and to implement repair and maintenance of the dike, resulting in an increase in the scale of public works projects during the period. With regular outside funding, subtle changes were made with respect to dike management involving the provincial administration, the dike office and its gentry managers, and the wards.

Keywords:   Pearl River Delta, mud embankments, floods, repair and maintenance, Mulberry Garden Dike, lineages, funding, wards, gentry, public works

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