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Emperor and AncestorState and Lineage in South China$
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David Faure

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753180

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753180.001.0001

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The Yao Wars and Ritual Orthodoxy

The Yao Wars and Ritual Orthodoxy

Chapter:
(p.93) Chapter Eight The Yao Wars and Ritual Orthodoxy
Source:
Emperor and Ancestor
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753180.003.0008

After tax registration was reformed, many households of the Pearl River Delta were not required to provide tax services. However, the practice of rituals had to be reformed before the lineage could be recognized as the dominant mode of social organization. These changes were the result of a combination of various events that seemed unconnected, beginning with the Yao wars of the 1460s up to the 1520s, which profoundly affected the ritual and political life of the region and hence, the local society's relationship with the imperial state. This chapter focuses on the Yao wars that took place in the Pearl River Delta, as well as the Great Rituals controversy in the 1520s. It also discusses the anti-Buddhist sentiments in Guangdong that spread to other parts of China, Wei Xiao's impact on Buddhist monasteries in the Pearl River Delta, and the social revolution of the sixteenth century.

Keywords:   Pearl River Delta, tax registration, households, Yao wars, rituals, Great Rituals controversy, Guangdong, China, monasteries, social revolution

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