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Constructing International Relations in the Arab World$
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Fred H. Lawson

Print publication date: 2006

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753722

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753722.001.0001

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Regulation, Surveillance, and State Formation

Regulation, Surveillance, and State Formation

Chapter:
(p.51) Chapter Two Regulation, Surveillance, and State Formation
Source:
Constructing International Relations in the Arab World
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753722.003.0003

This chapter investigates an influential set of concepts that has been proposed by historical sociologists, to see whether or not these concepts can account for the divergent paths that Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, Iraq and Syria took. Egypt's nationalist leadership has followed a posture of Westphalian sovereignty at a time when the central bureaucracy in Cairo possessed little more than a rudimentary capacity to monitor and regulate domestic affairs. The central administration of Iraq owned most if not all of the attributes that historical sociologists connect to the emergence of Westphalian sovereignty. The Second World War did little to enhance the infrastructural power of the Syrian state. By the time that Syria gained de facto independence, the state apparatus possessed few if any of the attributes that historical sociologists link to the emergence of Westphalian sovereignty.

Keywords:   Egypt, Tunisia, Jordan, Iraq, Syria, nationalist leadership, Westphalian sovereignty, historical sociologists, Second World War, infrastructural power

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