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Creating Military PowerThe Sources of Military Effectiveness$
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Risa A. Brooks and Elizabeth A. Stanley

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753999

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753999.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

Introduction: The Impact of Culture, Society, Institutions, and International Forces on Military Effectiveness

Introduction: The Impact of Culture, Society, Institutions, and International Forces on Military Effectiveness

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 Introduction: The Impact of Culture, Society, Institutions, and International Forces on Military Effectiveness
Source:
Creating Military Power
Author(s):
Risa A. Brooks
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753999.003.0001

This chapter describes why military effectiveness is such a critical issue worthy of study. It also considers the previous studies of military effectiveness, highlighting the strengths of individual research traditions and the need for a more unified, coherent research program to allow for greater accumulation of knowledge in this area. The military power is a core concept of international relations. By elaborating on the origins of military power, an even more pivotal concept in international relations can be attained: state power. This study then raises profound questions about how political scientists think about military power, state power, and the origins of both. The key properties of an effective military are its capacity for integration, responsiveness, high levels of skill, and ability to provide itself with highly capable weapons and equipment. The activities presented offered a way for tracing the impacts of causal variables on military effectiveness.

Keywords:   military effectiveness, military power, state power, responsiveness, skill

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