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Creating Military PowerThe Sources of Military Effectiveness$
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Risa A. Brooks and Elizabeth A. Stanley

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780804753999

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804753999.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Global Norms and Military Effectiveness: The Army in Early Twentieth-Century Ireland

Global Norms and Military Effectiveness: The Army in Early Twentieth-Century Ireland

Chapter:
(p.136) Chapter 6 Global Norms and Military Effectiveness: The Army in Early Twentieth-Century Ireland
Source:
Creating Military Power
Author(s):

Theo Farrell

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804753999.003.0006

This chapter describes what global norms are and how they come to shape national military behavior. It examines the effect of global norms on military effectiveness through a case study of the army in early twentieth-century Ireland. It specifically concentrates on the effect of norms of conventional warfare on the activities and effectiveness of the Irish Army. In this case, military integration suffered due to weapons procurement that could not keep pace with the army's ambitious doctrine and training aspirations. Foreign-trained Irish officers have promoted norms of conventional warfare in the Irish Army and reinforced through the army's own training programs. The Irish state was placed in risk due to the impact of norms of conventional warfare on the Irish Army.

Keywords:   global norms, national military behavior, military effectiveness, conventional warfare, Irish Army, training programs

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