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At the Crossroads of EmpiresMiddlemen, Social Networks, and State-Building in Republican Shanghai$
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Nara Dillon and Jean C. Oi

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780804756198

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804756198.001.0001

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What Is In a Network? Local, Personal, and Public Loyalties in the Context of Changing Conceptions of the State and Social Welfare

What Is In a Network? Local, Personal, and Public Loyalties in the Context of Changing Conceptions of the State and Social Welfare

Chapter:
(p.155) Chapter 8 What Is In a Network? Local, Personal, and Public Loyalties in the Context of Changing Conceptions of the State and Social Welfare
Source:
At the Crossroads of Empires
Author(s):

Bryna Goodman

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804756198.003.0008

This chapter explores how a sense of the public evolved out of native place associations and their philanthropic efforts. It also analyzes the shifting social practices and social valuations of native place networks, formal and informal, in association with shifts in political structures and ideology, particularly with regard to transformations in notions of the public (gong) and the people (gongzhong). It is noted that the flexibility of native place associations and networks in bridging the boundaries between public and private provided considerable and enduring utility. The performance of social welfare functions has been significant to the construction of native place community and to the authority that legitimated hierarchy within the community. Native place sentiment developed the possibility of a social network and of social assistance on the basis of the evocation of common referents of regional culture.

Keywords:   native place networks, native place associations, social welfare, native place community, social network, social assistance, regional culture

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