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The Woman Who Turned Into a Jaguar, and Other Narratives of Native Women in Archives of Colonial Mexico$
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Lisa Sousa

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780804756402

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804756402.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 21 April 2021

Sexual Crimes

Sexual Crimes

Chapter:
(p.148) Chapter Six Sexual Crimes
Source:
The Woman Who Turned Into a Jaguar, and Other Narratives of Native Women in Archives of Colonial Mexico
Author(s):

Lisa Sousa

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804756402.003.0006

Chapter 6 studies sexual attitudes and crimes, including adultery and rape, and their prosecution in preconquest and colonial times. Indigenous peoples themselves, not strictly friars, enforced a moral code of sexual behavior by gossiping about local scandals, reporting crimes to indigenous and Spanish magistrates, testifying in criminal trials about alleged transgressions, and in more extreme cases, resorting to violence, often with the help of relatives and friends, to punish misconduct. The chapter considers the ways in which indigenous and Spanish attitudes converged, especially in the importance placed on marriage as an institution that regulates sexuality and the strong condemnation of rape and adultery. Chapter 6 examines the relationship between sexual infidelity and violence in the household and community. Finally this chapter shows how Spanish attitudes regarding virginity and honor influenced, but did not alter entirely, indigenous gender ideology after the sixteenth century.

Keywords:   adultery, rape, virginity, uxoricide, homicide, theft, domestic violence, morality, Christianity

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