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Germans into JewsRemaking the Jewish Social Body in the Weimar Republic$
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Sharon Gillerman

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804757119

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804757119.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 18 October 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Germans into Jews
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804757119.003.0001

This introductory chapter presents an overview of the present book, which is about the Weimar Jewish paradox. It traces how social workers and physicians, lay people and religious leaders transformed the postwar Jewish crisis into an opportunity for Jewish revitalization. In the overlapping realms of family, welfare, and reproduction, Jewish reformers saw not only the threat of social disorder and potentially dangerous instability, but also the prospect for enlisting those very institutions in the drive to reconstitute a strengthened and more vibrant Jewish population. The book also builds on a body of literature that has substantially reassessed older notions of assimilation by examining the emergence of what the Zionist leader Kurt Blumenfeld first identified as a post-assimilation Jewish identity.

Keywords:   Weimar Jewish paradox, Jews, social reformers, postwar Jewish crisis, assimilation, Jewish identity, German Jewry

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