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Germans into JewsRemaking the Jewish Social Body in the Weimar Republic$
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Sharon Gillerman

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804757119

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804757119.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

Constructing a Jewish Body Politic: Declining Fertility and the Development of a Jewish Population Policy

Constructing a Jewish Body Politic: Declining Fertility and the Development of a Jewish Population Policy

Chapter:
(p.53) Two Constructing a Jewish Body Politic: Declining Fertility and the Development of a Jewish Population Policy
Source:
Germans into Jews
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804757119.003.0003

This chapter examines a Jewish vision of pronatalism that sought to harmonize the broader German imperatives of reproductive policy with an emphasis on specifically Jewish religious values. Long-standing anxieties about declining national birthrates and changing social mores in Germany led social commentators during the Weimar Republic to conclude that the emancipated “New Woman” was on a “birthstrike” which threatened to diminish the strength and health of the German population. If Weimar epitomized the modern belief that a scientific approach could provide solutions to even the most intractable social problems, then the rational assessment of the social and reproductive functions of mothers necessarily bestowed upon women, as “mothers of the nation,” a central role in rebuilding German and Jewish society.

Keywords:   Jews, protonatalism, reproductive policy, Weimar Republic, Germany

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