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Revolution within the RevolutionCotton Textile Workers and the Mexican Labor Regime, 1910–1923$
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Jeffrey Bortz

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780804758062

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804758062.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

The Mexican Cotton Textile Industry

The Mexican Cotton Textile Industry

Chapter:
(p.21) Chapter 2 The Mexican Cotton Textile Industry
Source:
Revolution within the Revolution
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804758062.003.0002

This chapter presents a history of Mexican cotton textile industry from its establishment in the 1830s through its turmoil during the revolution. The companies, factories, mill towns, textile zones, and production processes were the site and object of Mexico's workers' revolution. Four elements that most strongly influenced the shape of that revolution are highlighted. First was the spectacular growth of an industry that constituted Mexico's industrial revolution. Second, the development of ownership groups with strong foreign participation gave workers the possibility of combining their social goals with a national/patriotic discourse, which strengthened their feelings and cohesion. Third, the concentration of industry in four industrial corridors immeasurably facilitated communication among rebellious workers, and ultimately, unionization. Finally, the profitability and importance of the industry in early twentieth-century Mexico allowed it to survive and function during the years of upheaval.

Keywords:   Mexico, cotton textile industry, workers' revolution, industrial revolution, ownership groups, unionization

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