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Barcelona's Vocation of ModernityRise and Decline of an Urban Image$
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Joan Ramon Resina

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780804758321

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804758321.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Imagined City

Imagined City

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter Two Imagined City
Source:
Barcelona's Vocation of Modernity
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804758321.003.0003

Ildefons Cerdà (1816–1876), a civil engineer, helped shape a new Barcelona that exposed the weakness of a bourgeoisie unable to execute its chosen blueprint for the city. Implementation of Cerdà's plan showed that centralized bureaucracy was supreme over economic elites. A panoptic relation was established between the geometrically centered capital and a territory that used to be a periphery. Under Eugeni d'Ors's guidance, Noucentisme imagined the city as a total work of art that began from general blueprint to public surfaces and proceeded to private spaces of domesticity. Advocating a social order that was roughly the opposite of that of Catalonia, d'Ors proposed a return to conscientious citizenship in ambiguous language that at times could be interpreted as a demand for self-governance. The goal was not to freeze history, but to project the classic attitude onto the present in order to outline a concrete version of modernity.

Keywords:   Ildefons Cerdà, Barcelona, bourgeoisie, Noucentisme, modernity, Eugeni d'Ors, bureaucracy, elites, citizenship, self-governance

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